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PANELISTS


Professor François Berger
Director, Clinatec - Grenoble University (University of Joseph Fourier)
Micro and nanoelectronics: moving from medical nanotechnologies to patient care

Over the past decade, the innovation model underpinning healthcare research in Grenoble has undergone profound transformation. Microelectronics—once the fundamental technological base for research—has given rise to innovations like DNA chips and labs-on-chip. Researchers have leveraged these developments to come up with wearable and implantable systems like electrodes for deep neural stimulation and, more recently, molecular systems like Lipidots®, which encapsulate and carry drugs and imaging agents to targeted cells within the body.

This talk will review the new, multidisciplinary nature of research and the expanding scope of research, which now encompasses new links along the value chain. Beyond just developing new technologies, researchers are now playing an active role in preclinical and clinical trials. These activities are taking place at Clinatec, a biomedical research unit where technology specialists and practitioners from different fields work shoulder to shoulder.


Christophe Bernard
R&D Strategy Director - STMicroelectronics
Healthcare and fitness at home

For the past several months, STMicroelectronics has been experimenting with in-home healthcare and physical fitness services via an open-source web-based platform. The system enables healthcare professionals to monitor patients' heart rates and observe patients' responses to medical treatment and adjust dosages as needed. In addition, healthcare professionals can monitor patient compliance with in-home physical therapy or physical fitness programs and ensure that patients are meeting minimum physical activity levels. The system's architecture, which includes sensors worn by patients, various Android-based applications, and the in-home data processing unit, was developed by STMicroelectronics. Unlike traditional web-based units with proprietary applications, STMicro's data processing unit is open source and can be customized to include features like home energy management, lighting, air quality, temperature, and humidity, for example.


Patrick Boisseau
Program Manager, Nanomedicine, Leti/DTBS; Member, Executive Board, European Technology Platform on Nanomedicine
Micro and nanoelectronics: moving from medical nanotechnologies to patient care

Over the past decade, the innovation model underpinning healthcare research in Grenoble has undergone profound transformation. Microelectronics—once the fundamental technological base for research—has given rise to innovations like DNA chips and labs-on-chip. Researchers have leveraged these developments to come up with wearable and implantable systems like electrodes for deep neural stimulation and, more recently, molecular systems like Lipidots®, which encapsulate and carry drugs and imaging agents to targeted cells within the body.

This talk will review the new, multidisciplinary nature of research and the expanding scope of research, which now encompasses new links along the value chain. Beyond just developing new technologies, researchers are now playing an active role in preclinical and clinical trials. These activities are taking place at Clinatec, a biomedical research unit where technology specialists and practitioners from different fields work shoulder to shoulder.


Doctor François Chatelain
Co-founder and CEO - Cytoo
Cytoo, a new brand of biotech innovation

Cytoo, founded in 2008 in Grenoble, specializes in cell testing materials. The company has carved out a unique positioning that illustrate two key pillars of Grenoble's innovation model: breakthrough technologies and convergence between biology and micro and nanotechnology. Cytoo's products are not merely improvements on existing products. The company developed a totally new concept—a highly accurate geometry—that eliminates the variability that can disrupt high-content cell testing and screening. And

Cytoo is leveraging both industry-leading expertise in cellular biology and techniques from micro and nanotechnology to manufacture its products in clean room environments using processes developed by the microelectronics industry.

This unique business model enabled Cytoo to win its first contracts less than a year after the company was founded.


Michael Cima PhD.
David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and Faculty Director at Lemelson - MIT Program
Dr. Michael J. Cima is a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has an appointment at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He earned a B.S. in chemistry in 1982 (phi beta kappa) and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering in 1986, both from the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Cima joined the MIT faculty in 1986 as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to full Professor in 1995. He was elected a Fellow of the American Ceramics Society in 1997. Prof. Cima was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He now holds the David H. Koch Chair of Engineering at MIT. […] Finally, through his consulting work he has been a major contributor to the development of high throughput systems for discovery of novel crystal forms and formulations of pharmaceuticals. Prof. Cima also has extensive entrepreneurial experience. He is co-founder of MicroChips Inc., a developer of microelectronic based drug delivery and diagnostic systems. Prof. Cima took two sabbaticals to act as senior consultant and management team member at Transform Pharmaceuticals Inc. a company that he helped start and that was ultimately acquired by Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He is a co-founder and director at T2 Biosystems a medical diagnostics company. Most recently, Prof. Cima co-founded SpringLeaf Therapeutics a specialty pharmaceutical company and Taris Biomedical a urology products company.


Doctor Alexandra Fuchs
Co-founder and COO - Cytoo
Cytoo, a new brand of biotech innovation

Cytoo, founded in 2008 in Grenoble, specializes in cell testing materials. The company has carved out a unique positioning that illustrate two key pillars of Grenoble's innovation model: breakthrough technologies and convergence between biology and micro and nanotechnology. Cytoo's products are not merely improvements on existing products. The company developed a totally new concept—a highly accurate geometry—that eliminates the variability that can disrupt high-content cell testing and screening. And

Cytoo is leveraging both industry-leading expertise in cellular biology and techniques from micro and nanotechnology to manufacture its products in clean room environments using processes developed by the microelectronics industry.

This unique business model enabled Cytoo to win its first contracts less than a year after the company was founded.


Doctor Jérôme Garin
Director - Large Scale Biology research unit (U1038); Director - IRTSV (CEAGrenoble's Institute for Research in Life Sciences and Technology)
Promise Advanced Proteomics innovates in protein quantification

Promise Advanced Proteomics (http://www.promise-proteomics.com), a subsidiary of biotech firm PX Therapeutics, offers protein analytics using PSAQ (Proteomic Standard Absolute Quantification), a technology published and patented in 2007 by researchers at the CEA.

PSAQ uses proteins marked by stable isotopes as internal benchmarks for mass spectrometry, a strategy that enables highly-accurate dosing of proteins within complex biological samples. Applications include assessing potential biomarkers for pathologies, determining the bioavailability of therapeutic proteins, checking water and food quality, and screening athletes for performance-enhancing drugs.





Thierry Grange
Director, Grenoble Ecole de Management; Engineering Degree; Graduate Degree in Business Administration, IEP Grenoble; Co-director, AACSB Blue Ribbon Committee on Accreditation Quality
Management, driving the innovation chain

Good researchers alone do not guarantee successful innovation. They need competent managers by their side to structure the innovation chain, contributing crucial know how in areas like marketing, time to market, and business models. Management professionals can also help build communities that cut across R&D, design, and marketing.

Grenoble Ecole de Management has achieved excellence in innovation management and today offers several academic programs in this discipline. The school's researchers explore new business models and internal decision making and project management processes.

The school's researchers recently developed a "go/no-go" system to help Schneider Electric determine whether or not to pursue innovative projects by comparing the synergies and tensions a project would create within the business.


Doctor Edward Mitchell
Acting Head of Business Development of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility; Doctor of Molecular Biophysics
How large instruments can help advance innovation in healthcare

Large physics research instruments like ESRF and ILL (Institut Laue-Langevin) are widely used by the healthcare industry. Increasingly, researchers in the life sciences are also turning to these instruments. In fact, life science research—from protein crystallography and functionalized nanoparticle observation through to checking shunt placement using very low doses of radiation—accounts for a third of all activity at ESRF. At ILL, which boasts the world's most powerful continuous neutron source, researchers are developing targeted radioisotopes destined to treat certain types of cancer.

This talk will review several examples of partnerships between research and industry and the impact of these partnerships on academic research. For example, ESRF now has a beamline dedicated to medical research. Researchers are using the beamline to develop new treatments, including for brain tumors.


Mickael J. Page, PhD
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs provost at Bentley University.
Michael Page is the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Bentley University having joined the University some three years ago as the Dean of Business and the McCallum Graduate School. Before joining Bentley Mike served as the Dean of Post-Experience Programs of RSM Erasmus University and as the Executive Director of the Rotterdam School of Management (RSM) B.V., The Netherlands. Previously he was the Dean of Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus Graduate School of Business, and also served a term as its Dean of Academic Affairs. Mike joined Erasmus after 16 years as a Professor of finance at the University of Cape Town, So. Africa.

Mike is a board member of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and is Chair of the Initial Accreditation Committee (IAC). Additionally, he is a member of the Accreditation Coordination Committee (ACC), the International Blue Ribbon Committee on Accreditation Quality (BRC) and the Committee on Issues in Management Education (CIME). He is also actively engaged with the international management education industry, including serving on the board of the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) and working with its EQUIS accreditation program. Mike also supports development activities offered by the Central and Eastern European Management Development Association (CEEMAN).


Professor Gregory A. Petsko, PhD.
D. Phil., Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry Protein Crystallography - Brandeis University
Gregory A. Petsko is Chair of the Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, where from 1994 to 2008 he served as Director of the Rosenstiel Basic Medical Sciences Research Center. Since 1996 has held the title of Gyula and Katica Tauber Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry, succeeding Prof. William P. Jencks, the first holder of this chair. His awards include the Sidhu Award of the American Crystallographic Association for outstanding contributions to X-ray diffraction, the Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry of the American Chemical Society, an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award, and in 1991 the Max Planck Prize, which he shared with Professor Roger Goody of Heidelberg for their work on the origins of some human cancers. In 1995 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and received a Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2001 he received the Lynen Medal (shared with Professor Janet Thornton) and was elected to the Institute of Medicine. In 2002, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2010 he was elected to the American Philosophical Society. He is immediate Past-President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He is also the President-Elect of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research interests include protein structure and function and the development of methods to treat age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases. For the past ten years he has written a widely-read column on science and society.


Doctor Tristan Rousselle
Co-founder and CEO - PX'Therapeutics
Tristan Rousselle holds a Ph.D. in cell biology from the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble. He co-founded in 2000 with Nicolas Mouz, the company Protein'eXpert now called PX'Therapeutics. This biotechnology company is specialized in the engineering, pre-clinical and clinical development of therapeutic proteins. The expertise of the company relies on two pharmaceutical production platforms based on bacterial and mammalian cells technologies. In addition to its service activity PX'Therapeutics is co-developing with academics, SMEs and pharmaceutical partners products in the field of infectious diseases and cancer. PX'Therapeutics currently employs 65 people in Grenoble and Lyon.

Tristan Rousselle is also Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the company Elicityl based in Grenoble and chairman of the board of the Non Profit Organization acCInov Association (affiliated to LyonBioBole).


Professor Philippe Sabatier
Teaching and Research Faculty Member, TIMC - IMAG, Prof. Grenoble University (Joseph Fourier University)
BioHealth Computing Graduate School

Grenoble's Université Joseph Fourier has just opened a new BioHealth Computing Graduate School. Certified by the European Commission's Erasmus Mundus program, the school will train high-level investigators capable of revitalizing the innovation process at businesses in the life sciences and facilitating the transfer of new technologies from research to patient care.

The curriculum will be multidisciplinary and will draw upon systemic biology, process modeling, product lifecycle management, and problem solving, for example.

Applicants will come from clinical research, molecular biotechnology, mathematics, simulation, and healthcare and the environment. They will receive four months of classroom instruction before applying their new knowledge through research and development projects with labs or businesses.


Professor Valérie Sabatier
Director, DBA Programs for the U.S. and Switzerland, Grenoble Ecole de Management
Emerging business models in the healthcare industry

Emerging business models could send the pharmaceutical industry into a tailspin. New practices like personalized medicine, nanobiotechnologies, theranostics, and systemic biology are opening doors to new service-oriented approaches—to the detriment of traditional product-driven strategies. Increasingly, treatments will be tailored to each individual patient rather than targeting generic pathologies. Diagnostics and biotech firms—although small—are gearing up to play a greater role in alliances with major pharmaceutical companies.

This talk will review the potential transformation just over the horizon and will examine the new playing field—one that will require a restructuring of the entire value chain on a global scale. Examples of these emerging business models will also be discussed.


Professor William Stirling
Scientific Director, GIANT
GIANT: Grenoble Innovation for Advanced New Technologies

Grenoble's GIANT Innovation Campus was founded in 2006. The purpose of the campus is to achieve excellence in science, technology, and innovation by creating new knowledge and developing new applications that improve the everyday lives of individual people and contribute to the advancement of society.

The campus will focus on:
  • Finding solutions to society's major challenges in information and communication technologies, energy, and healthcare
  • Breaking through the silos that currently divide academic research by creating cross-disciplinary centers of excellence addressing functional objectives
  • Aligning urban development with advances in science and technology
The GIANT Innovation Campus represents a total of €1.3 billion in investment over six years.

In addition to high-caliber scientific research, GIANT also offers researchers, engineers, students, and entrepreneurs excellent quality of life thanks to a dynamic yet environmentally-progressive urban environment and convenient access to a truly exceptional natural environment just outside the city.


Alain Stricker-Krongrad PhD.
President and CSO - Biomedical Research Models and Biomere
Alain Stricker-Krongrad is Chief Scientific Officer at Biomedical Research Models. Alain was previously Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Scientific Adviser at Charles River Laboratories. Alain has managed pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety departments for multiple disease indications within Charles River Laboratories, Millennium Pharmaceuticals in the U.S., and Novartis Headquarters and Ciba-Geigy in Switzerland. Alain received his License, Master and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Nancy, France. He conducted his doctoral and post-doctoral research on preclinical and clinical drug evaluation at the National Institute of Scientific and Medical Research (INSERM) for which he has received two international awards for distinguished research. Alain has received accreditations from the National List of Qualifications in both Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacology (France), and is presently Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy.

He is an elected Member of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology and a member of the American College of Toxicology. He plays an active role in the Safety Pharmacology Society and is on the Editorial Board of Expert Opinion in Drug Discovery. Alain has published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles and brings a wealth of expertise in preclinical and early clinical drug efficacy and safety evaluation.


Professor Gary Tearney
Professor in Pathology at HMS and MGH, Program Leader, Optical Diagnostics at CIMIT
Dr. Tearney's research interests are focused on the development and clinical validation of non-invasive, high-resolution optical imaging methods for disease diagnosis. Dr. Tearney's lab was the first to perform human imaging in the coronary arteries and gastrointestinal tract in vivo with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), which provides cross-sectional images of tissue architectural microstructure at a resolution of 10 µm. He has also conducted many of the seminal studies validating OCT and is considered an expert on OCT image interpretation. Recently, Dr. Tearney's lab has invented a next generation OCT technology, termed µOCT, which has a resolution of 1 µm and is capable of imaging cells and sub cellular structures in the coronary wall. Dr. Tearney has also developed several other technologies, including a confocal endomicroscope capable of imaging the entire esophagus, an ultraminiature three-dimensional endoscope, a highly efficient form of near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), and novel fluorescence spectroscopy and multimodality imaging techniques. He has an active program in Raman spectroscopy and has conducted the first intracoronary Raman in vivo. Dr. Tearney is co-editor of The Handbook of Optical Coherence Tomorgraphy and has written over 170 peer-reviewed publications, including papers that have been highlighted on the covers of Science, Nature Medicine, Circulation, Gastroenterology, and Journal of American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Tearney's work extends beyond his laboratory at MGH, many of his technologies are being produced commercially and he has founded the International Working Group on Intravascular OCT Standardization and Validation, a group that is dedicated to establishing standards to ensure the widespread adoption of this imaging technology.


Professor Peter D. Wagner
Distinguished Professor of Medicine & Bioengineering - University of California, San Diego
Dr. Wagner is Distinguished Professor of Medicine & Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla, CA. After obtaining his M.B., B.S. and B.Sc. (Medicine) degrees from Sydney University in 1968, he did postdoctoral work with Professor John West at UCSD in La Jolla, CA, USA. He then joined the UCSD medical faculty and has remained there to the present time. His research addresses the theoretical and experimental basis of oxygen transport and its limitations in the lungs and skeletal muscles in health and disease. A particular focus is muscle capillary growth regulation using molecular biological approaches in integrated systems—the role of O2, microvascular hemodynamics, physical factors, nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators in transcriptional regulation of angiogenic growth factors. Of particular interest is the role of VEGF in both pulmonary and skeletal muscle structure and function. He has served NIH as a study section member and chair, as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology, was President of the American Thoracic Society 2005-2006, and was President of the American Physiological Society in 2010. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed research articles and over 100 invited chapters and other contributions. He will serve as Editor in Chief of the Journal of Applied Physiology effective July 2011.
 
 
 

Office for Science and Technology - Embassy of France in the United States